The TAAG program provided employment-related retention and advancement services to help workers with low income maintain their jobs and move up in the labor market. 

The TAAG program provided employment-related retention and advancement services to help workers with low income maintain their jobs and move up in the labor market. 

The TAAG program provided job retention and career advancement services individualized to the participants’ career interests and personal circumstances. A collaboration of four agencies provided TAAG services; the agencies included a local public human services agency, workforce organizations, and a community college. TAAG participants worked with a service team, supervised by a project manager and comprised of staff from the four agencies.  The teams included job coaches, job counselors, job developers, case managers, learning plan specialists, and employment specialists. Job retention services included job coaching and conflict resolution; assistance developing household budgets; and referrals to mental health and substance abuse services as needed. Career advancement services included helping participants identify better jobs in the job market; coaching participants on how to have conversations with employers about pay raises, promotions, or increasing work hours; and counseling participants about appropriate work behaviors for work advancement opportunities. Some participants lost their jobs after they enrolled in the evaluation but before starting TAAG services. In these cases, the TAAG team of providers offered job search assistance, including identifying job leads; preparing resumes; helping with job applications. The TAAG program provided additional services to help participants maintain employment, such as assistance with food stamps, transitional child care services, subsidized health insurance, gas vouchers, and car repairs. The TAAG program also helped participants identify short-term vocational training programs to support job advancement as well as GED or other education programs. Participants were able to access TAAG program services for one year.

The program served employed people who were (1) leaving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, (2) participating in the state Food Stamp Employment and Training program, or (3) participating in the Employment Related Day Care program (which provided child care subsidies to low-income, working families). The program also served unemployed people who lost their job just before beginning TAAG services. TAAG took place in Medford, OR.

Year evaluation began: 2002
Populations and employment barriers: Employed, Parents
Intervention services: Case management, Employment retention services, Supportive services, Financial education, Soft skills training, Work readiness activities, Employment coaching, Job search assistance, Job development/job placement
Setting(s): Urban only

Effectiveness Rating and Effect By Outcome Domain

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Outcome domain Term Effectiveness rating Effect in 2018 dollars and percentages Effect in standard deviations Sample size
Increase earnings Short-term Supported favorable $1,652 per year 0.08 1628
Long-term Little evidence to assess support unfavorable $-377 per year -0.02 1628
Very long-term No evidence to assess support
Increase employment Short-term Little evidence to assess support favorable 1% (in percentage points) 0.01 1628
Long-term Little evidence to assess support unfavorable -1% (in percentage points) -0.02 1628
Very long-term No evidence to assess support
Decrease benefit receipt Short-term Little evidence to assess support favorable $-6 per year 0.00 1628
Long-term Not supported unfavorable $201 per year 0.07 1164
Very long-term No evidence to assess support
Increase education and training All measurement periods No evidence to assess support

Studies of this Intervention

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Study Quality Rating Study Counts per Rating
High High 2